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in abnormal circumstances. there is aleppo the city and also the periphery. they make up the province. all of the periphery has been liberated. when i was in aleppo i missed the hustle and bustle of the city. the first thing i did their was i was hosted by the revolutionary transition. they come together into what they can to fill this void. we took a tour of the city. most of the shops where closed down. some were not. i wanted to find out that was trying to function as a transitional government structure. to be honest with you, i am using a lot though as a case in point. to be honest, i thought i was going to meet with simple people. the conflict has not yet come to an end. we were pleasantly surprised. the operation we encountered was a lot more specific than we thought. they held elections. the chairman was a highly educated person with a ph.d. in engineering from france. dick also started to all different committees. -- they also started 12 different committees. judiciary, committee on finance, and they were working on a number of products. i love today to talk about those projects th
, december 3, and that will focus on high speed and inner city passenger rail grant program. and then we'll have the final hearing on this important subject. thursday, the 13th of december, and that will be on the northeast corridor. ironically yesterday i was back in new york city actually looking at some of the flood and storm damage. many of the transportation infrastructure facilities were adversely impacted, huge amount of damage. they have incredible new york city is resilient, and how well they are coming back. i think they got about 95% of their transit operations, rail was particularly hit. almost all of east side lower manhattan tunnels flooded, and just think of the massive effort put forward to get those trains running. they probably move about 20% of all passengers in the world in new york city. and a hit like that was incredible. i understand mayor bloomberg, we met with yesterday, will be in town today, and we had discussions yesterday about fema, which our committee oversees and also transportation and infrastructure that was hurt. that may be the subject of additional sc
and former chancellor of new york city public-school, joel klein, hosted by the foundation for excellence and education. this is about an hour. >> welcome to this evening's bought test of morning joe. [laughter] the energy in this room is nice. how this issue of educational reform has ripened, the combination of need, the talent we see in this room. there is a sense that the moment has a ride. the other is jeb bush. i am a great believer that two things matter in life -- ideas and people. that is the driver of change in history. jeb is a perfect example of in what he is doing. he is the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. the fact that you are here is the greatest salute you could give. condie and that, the the national security background. we used to mess around with something called the rand bond calculated. it used to calculate the cep, t he circular error robert roe -- error probable. are today. we have travelled a considerable distance. when asked what the great -- the greatest national-security threat is, he did not say al qaeda, iran, north korea, what he said w
are battle zones. it is a city that has a big middle class that was a thriving commercial hub, and people do not know what is going to happen. physically, do a spot check points over the place. this used to be one of the most secure capitals of the middle east. host: where is president assad at the moment? caller: we seldom see him. occasionally he will make a public appearance. by and large, i think he is invisible. he is not highly visible for someone who was made such a determined effort to stay in power, despite what is happened to his country. occasionally he will give an interview to the foreign press or even the national press. he is more visible in posters at this point. host: the "l.a. times" bureau chief joining us here in washington. you can'm wondering if provide an update on what is happening in tripoli from your vantage point. caller: i just spent a couple of days up there. it is the second set of web and on. -- city of lebanon. sunni muslims car the prevalent population and prevalent rebel group. there's been periodic combat there between sunni gunmen and people who are part o
town, has been killed by indiscriminate shelling in the city. dareaa is 7 kilometers south of damascus. and it has been days of fighting with the security forces. this is why the security forces target the city. it is very close to the damascus capital. they use the fighter jets and the shelling. the story of mohammad is very important. he is a peaceful activist. he graduated from damascus university. since 2003, he was very active on social networks, working with other activists in the city to organize peaceful demonstrations against the war in iraq. this is where the security forces detained him. they released him in 2005. since then, he was very active in humanitarian assistance, along with his friends, including one who was killed in the beginning of the revolution. mohammad established what is called -- a well-known magazine in syria. it is called "national gripe." ""grape." this magazine is in arabic and in english. every week, they come up with what is going on the ground. and they come from the analytic pieces from the analysts inside the country. this magazine did an important
extent. the problem was, it was not a high-speed rail project. it was an important inner-city passenger way. i tried to negotiate with the governor and others. there were other interests in the state that wanted to go all the way to tampa. the governor review did. there were concerns about the length of the tourist area to tampa. it is a no-brainer. it should be built, it can be built. it could be self sustaining. it can be a great product. but connected the compromise to build it in phases. there are only two left in the united states now. the secretary and i did all we could in our power to make that happen and it did not happen. the money did come back. i was pleased a good portion of it did go into the northeast corridor. we cannot do that piecemeal. we need to do it and get it done not in 30 years but a fraction of that time. we can make it happen. one reason i came back is to get that done. we will figure out a way. a multibillion-dollar project in california, and will not be a dog. we want success. we need a plan. we will work with folks. we need to expedite it. then we need to s
of the bill, a health clinic in the city of sunrise, florida, as the william "bill" kling v.a. clinic. william passed away sadly on august 6 at age 84. my deepest appreciation goes out to the committee on veterans' affairs and chairman miller who is a great friend from the state of florida, for supporting this effort and helping it to come to the floor. bill was a member of our greatest generation of americans, serving our nation in the navy during world war ii. but this was far from over when he returned from war. in fact, it was just beginning. bill claims -- became our strongest advocate and helping generations of veterans as they returned to civilian life. he worked tirelessly to make sure our veterans were getting the benefits they deserved, from education to quality health care through our v.a. system. i'm sure our florida colleagues will tell you that bill was a force to be reckoned with, pushing the urgency of the issue at hand. i know he will be sorely missed. in particular, my thoughts and prayers goes out to bill's family, including his daughter. i had the distinct pleasure, mr. spe
tunnel in the world in the brooklyn battery tunnel. i take it almost every day i'm in new york city because my home in brooklyn is connected to it. it was totally filled with water. both tubes, from one end to the other, from the manhattan end to the brooklyn end. ere were close to 100 million gallons of water that had to be pumped out of that tunnel and it's still not back up to snuff. that's one of many examples. there's so many. the mta did a very good job. i want to congratulate joe lhota. they moved their rolling stock to high ground. tried to barricade this awful flood in the best way they could. boy, it's awful. the mta is the largest public transportation system in the country. it's the life blood of new york. it's our circulatory system. 3.5 million people g on and off manhattan island every day to work. wow. 3.5 million people. i guess that's more than the people in mississippi and probably more than the people in dade county, any way. and we depend on it. 2.63 billion trips a year. as i said, the mta took a lot of necessary precautions. but this is 108-year-old system. it
from outside washington into washington. it depends from city-to-city. boston business leaders are interested in health care. miami, transportation, san diego, international -- an intellectual property -- it varies from city-to-city. in terms of immigration reform, what we have seen as different sectors of the economy look at immigration differently. the high-tech community is looking at bringing in more high-skilled workers or keeping graduates in the united states to help them with challenges in computer sciences, for example, or health sciences. you have the hotel industry and the airline industry focused on trying to make sure that travel visas are administered more efficiently so we can bring in more tourists to spend more money. you have the industry sectors with an interest in immigration. our view is immigration reform will be a big issue in 2013 and you will see big companies across sectors working together, combining shared interests to get something done. host: here is a tweet from one of our viewers -- how does the national debt directly effect businesses, or does i
life of albany capital city. here is the mayor talking about the city. [video clip] >> it is the capital of the greatest aid until the country as far as i am concerned. we have a great history people want to know about. it is a great story to tell. every group would enter the world -- 97,000 population -- 98,000. we just about double every day with the number of workers that come in. you have your other businesses and people coming to the city. there are challenges no doubt like every urban city here in new york and across the country. is the attitude about urban education and how many kids we are losing their are not graduating from schools. basically saying, we have an issue here we have to deal with. i try to discuss that with other mayors across the state and with the decision makers. we have to come up with solutions. it is a burden for a lot of cities, not just school taxes but property taxes and trying to balance the budget to provide the services needed. this are two major problems. this is a very old city. we have a lot of beautiful historic buildings. and
that flies world war ii here to see this memorial at no cost. they fly from 117 cities from across the country and have flown over 100,000 veterans to date. for the past two years, my business partners and i and our team at precinct media, have all of the veterans and volunteers from the awesome stars and stripes honor flight in milwaukee. it is my honor to direct your attention to two world war ii veterans with us today. they are amazing guys and have become a very good friends. i would first like to acknowledge julian and his daughter julie. [applause] he served in the navy as a cook and also on the burial disposal units were he buried both japanese and american soldiers. he is a published poet and took his first trip to washington, d.c., on and on a flight. next and what to tell you about joe. he is a company today by his wife. [applause] many of you know joe but you might not know why. that picture was taken of him in 1945 for the life magazine. he was called the human skeleton, weighing only 70 pounds. after suffering in a prison camp, his photograph became one of the most ico
and regions. i know they can appreciate what you and your city council and citizens have been going through. let me offer you our best in this effort. mr. king has been the state director of the new york small business development center. he oversees 24 regional centers, 35 outbreaks centers. all of your experience must certainly be called bond at tested for the job that is ahead of you. the president and ceo of long island association, one of the most respected organizations in new york. he long island economy is made up of businesses, 90% employ 20 people or less. we are interested in what your businesses are saying, how we can be as helpful as possible. businesses,our hearts go out te that you have lost and the devastation. make sure that your buttons are pressed and you're speaking directly into the microphone. >> good morning, committee members. it is a privilege and honor to be here today. hoboken is located just across the river from new york city and is the home of frank sinatra. we have hundreds of businesses that call our square-mile city there,. we are one of the most densely pop
. we have that money back into the budget since then. i will look carefully what he says about the city broadband. we are working very hard to make sure all the plants are on track to deliver the superfast brought than that is important for cities and rural areas. >> a serious threat proposed to democracy. the police have stated there is evidence of loyalist involvement. i take this opportunity to condemn this assault on democracy. will he agree to meet with me to discuss the security situation? >> i join her in condemning the violence we have seen. in no way are the people being loyal or standing up for britishness. by linda is unjustified. i agree completely. we should pay tribute again to the work the police to all of our behalf. i am always happy to eet and talk. >> will my honorable friends join me in congratulating my two young entrepreneurs who have taken the initiative? does the prime minister agree this is just the sort of
are better off with that initial overbuilding. >> had you satisfied or turnoff city about the internet? -- have you satisfied your curiosity about the internet? >> these weeks have reminded me of how important and how intertwined and how fascinating the way in which the infrastructure we have created has built itself up in cities and on the coasts. it brought me back to square one and keeping my curiosity on the systems and not just the internet, but power and aviation and the large complicated things that we depend on so much. >> "tubes" is the name of the book. andrew blum is the author. this is "communicators" on c- span. >> sometimes he was a cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. many of his age and class, they're not going to apologize to a young and private secretary. he had a way of turning the tables. his version of an apology would be to say, well, i am a kind man and you are doing a good job today. but the issue was never settled. he always had to get the
from york and new jersey urged congress to approve a supplemental funding for its cities affected by hurricane cindy. two officials with the small business administration testified. this is one hour and 45 minutes. >> good morning. thank you for joining us today to discuss the small business administration's response to hurricane sandy. i've of like to thank our witnesses that will be testifying in just a moment. i will introduce them in just a moment. let me make a couple of opening statements. we are here today to evaluate the response and recovery effort in the aftermath of hurricane same day as the largest ice storm in u.s. history. hurricane zandi claimed the lives of 130 to americans, it damaging and destroying more than 600,000 homes and 459,000 businesses leaving more than 8.5 million families with out fire or running water. most of the power grid has been turned back on. they're still communities that are challenged. the scale has treated significant challenges. this a require a sustained effort a part of the local officials. voluntary earlier this week i had the chance t
and eastern europe -- berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying in rubble -- lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first book, and while this is in no way a sequel it represents thoughts i had. one thing i got interested in is the question why no people went along with it. what is the mentality? what are institutional pressures? why do camp guard do what they are told to do? i decided to write about this period right after world war ii, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory and a clear ideology, and it was at this moment the red army marched into central europe and began imposing that system on the central european states, so you can see how from scratch -- what did the soviets think their system was? what did they think was important, and how did they try to carry it out? >> where did
, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying in rubble -- lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first spoke -- book, and while this is in no way a sequel it represents thoughts i had. one thing i got interested in is the question why no people went along with it. what is the mentality? what are institutional pressures? why do camp guard do what they are told to do? i decided to write about this period right after world war ii, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory and a clear ideology, and it was at this moment the red army marched into central europe and began imposing that system on the central european states, so you can see how from scratch -- what did the soviets think their system was? what did they think was important, and how did they try to carry it out? >> where did they get to right to march into eastern europe? >>
on a regular basis with your parents? >> yes. that was part of my interest. back in the new york city public schools, i had a great teacher. mrs. roth would read the newspaper and about martin luther king. he was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party headquarters and was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some women thought this was really cute, this little boy and leaflets. and she asked me why. and i made the case and got in early start in my political career. she said this is for you and she hands this box of pastries. i took a back to the liberal headquarters and we opened it up and there were all of these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics -- the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughnuts. [
? in the northeast, where a big cities right at sea level. they are already liable to stone -- to storm say. -- to storms today. as the world warms, we will have increasing risks, but we have already built into our cities and agriculture and water and heat. but is that water vulnerable ready -- vulnerability trickling into the system? >> until now, you have the ability of with drying unlimited amounts of water. for the first time, they're intending to limit them and people are up in arms. that is a freedom you're taking away >> you really mean arms. >> yes, i do. 1 >> , some of the drought with sought and colorado is affected by climate? >> it comes down to what you said in what the future will look like. lee have seen longer fire seasons, larger fires, and a lot of resources and wrote. in regards to our forests, we see the early signs, the tip of the iceberg, what these forests will do during stress. widespread massive pre-mortality events? these are pretty strongly linked to temperature. it is fairly safe to say it these are warnings of what is coming. >> when you are in colorado doing re
there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over last -- >> 8-to-10 years? guest: if we get rid of land use restrictions, i am optimistic, but if we do not, housing prices will go what, then we will be poised for another big financial crisis. host: john joins us from michigan.
to parties in 1947 and 1948. you imagine a city where everything is rubble and there is almost nothing standing. the ymca, this poses such a threat and such a problem that at the highest level the communist leaders right to one another, we must do something. we must destroy the ymca. they close it up, and in a tragic moment, the communist youth group is sending to smash it, because anything that is a spontaneous organization is seen as a potential threat to the regime. >> of one. you mentioned -- at one point you mentioned sartre and p icasso. what role did they play? >> sartre was a philosopher of the time. picasso was one of the great modernist painters. at one time they were either communist or communist sympathizers. both of them were seen as a justification. if even people like picasso end were communists, it was ok for other people. picasso was taken to see a new apartment block was being built in the city, of homes for the workers project, which was seen as a sign for progressive architecture, and he painted a picture of one of these new apartments, which later became a many tou
on the part of the public. why has the city never been able to get its arms around that level of fraud and abuse and what does it say for the expansion of government? >> it is expenses -- expensive to weed out the fraud and abuse. it takes a lot of government time and money. i do think it is worth doing. her we do not do it nearly enough. but it has been something -- government, at times, is wasteful in what it does not do as much as it is in what it does do. it never is risen to the top level as i think it should and hope it does. one of the reasons i did not want a government-run option is because that would have been a dumping ground for another government program to provide insurance and move away from the private market. i believe in the private market for insurance. there are cases where people are not insurable in the private market, that you have a government program. that is why it came about. " we are capable of crunching numbers to figure out how you cover people of a certain age block of have an entire barac them. we were able to find a way to do it through a private market
that we have in all of our cities. i will end here and i will be more than happy to answer questions that you have a. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> the first thing i would like to ask you, trying to look more into the new syrian position, my concern is that the rights of the minorities and in the new syrian opposition has not been really addressed as the same issues were also presented. how do you address this issue? your last. trying to think about what is going to happen next, that is an issue that the new syrian position should address. >> the rights of the minorities is an important issue. sometimes we emphasize the issues from their own perspective. when the syrian uprising started, christians, alliance, and christians being killed by participating. he decided to go back to his hometown. he is from damascus, but he is playing a role by training journalist to do the video to document the crimes. he is being killed. he became one of the icons of the syrian revolution. it is many, many names. this is why the leader of the syrian council is kurdish and the third leader is ch
. [applause] >> now that that the turnpike extends past the city to the airport, any thoughts about revising the song? >> you mean the turnpike no longer ends in boston, it goes all the way to summer set, no. what town is the airport in? >> that's got a ring to it but it doesn't rhyme. that's the thing is the internal rhyme. that song has four rhyming schemes going at once. it's got to be boston unless they take it to aust tin texas. [applause] >> i want to thank all of you for joining us this afternoon. i want to remind you of our next lunch on december 18, we have leon panetta, i'm sure if you have some advice on how to stolve fiscal cliff i'm sure heed like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the journalism broadcast center for organizing today's event. and i was wondering if you had one last song you'd like to sing us out on. >> [applause] >> can she borrow your stool? >> this is my wife kim and her
free. bob in rapid city, south dakota, republican caller. caller: whee are a right-to- work state. in the past week we had an article in the newspaper that we are 16th in the nation in income. we averaged 44,000. where is the nation averages 41,000. so it's just not true that a right-to-work state means lower income. our unemployment rate is around 5% or 5.2. host: 4.5%, according to this washington times piece this morning. caller: our union membership in the state is 5.6%. so it is not very high. we have three of the poorest counties in the country, and south dakota, also. those are primarily indian reservations. without those numbers pulling the numbers down, we would be even higher than that. desk because you are a right-to- work state does not mean you are giving up anything in the labor force. -- just because. host: in north dakota the natural gas and oil industry has really boomed in the last few years. is that the case in south dakota? caller: we get a little bit of that, particularly in western south dakota, because it flows into the northwestern part of the state. we are
cities, 681 villages, and more than 1300 townships. ohio is called the mother of presidents. it is the home of eight great ohioans who have become president of these united states -- presidents william henry harrison, benjamin harrison, william mckinley, william howard taft, james abrams garfield, warren harding, ulysses s. grant, and rutherford hayes. it is my pleasure today to state that today ohio's electoral college members will cast their votes to elect president barack obama. the united states constitution, federal law, and ohio law all have called on this group of individuals who will organize themselves as the ohio elector college, according to the ohio revised code. it specifies the secretary of state shall convene the electoral college. so i will now pass the gavel back to the secretary of state, secretary jon husted. >> thank you, congresswoman- elect beatty. one of the traditions of democracy is the orderly transition of power, or in this case, the retention of it. this orderly transition of power, particularly as it relates to the power of the presidency, makes
to be read occupied one power that came back. -- homes not elevated were often destroyed. city-wide mitigation may be more effective strategy. i would also caution about going underground. everything in manhattan was underground including hospitals and emergency room that were flooded by salt water and destroyed. where does it make sense to talk about this on a homeowner basis? where is this talk that we will have to look at mitigating a part of a community that piece by piece will not address the overall impacts. we are going to work with gail glass and state and with the science community. -- with the scientists and the state and with the science community. once you get into a dense urban area, the solution will not work. we have to focus on that type of infrastructure and the best way to mitigate future damage. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. in your area when katrina hit, you showed what persistence to make sure your area was treated fairly. even though i must tell you many of us were not a joyful to hear your requests but never the less the outcome was great. you hav
crime cities in the country. but i never hear anything about it. the only thing i hear is every time something happens to a white kid. its national news, it's big news. let's talk about all kids, not just the white kids. host: a tweet -- let's hear more from the commander-in-chief in newtown, connecticut, yesterday addressing the cause of what happened on friday. [video clip] >> these tragedies must end. to end them, we must change. we will be told that the causes of such violence are complex and that's true. no single law or set of laws can eliminate people from the world or prevent every senseless acts of violence in our society. but that cannot be an excuse for inaction. surely we can do better than this. if there is even one step we can take to save another child or another parent or another town from the grief that visited tucson and aurora and oak creek and newtown, and communities from t communitieso blacksburg before that, surely we have an obligation to try. host: that was president obama speaking last night. we're asking whether you think u.s. gun laws should change. here's
, neighbors, community members, city leaders, leaders of our country, the mayor, and other special guests. i have the honor of introducing my friend and our champion, secretary of education arne duncan. give him a hand. [applause] since he came to washington with president obama in 2009, he has been a forward thinking and caring supporter of the district. to the teachers and principals of this city in this country. he has helped secure millions of dollars in funding. they helped shape innovative policies, all across the country. he is a true leader, not just in time for celebration, but in times of tragedy and sorrow. yesterday, he attended the funeral of the principle of sandy hook elementary school that lost her life protecting the children of the school. ladies and gentlemen, i am proud, thankful, and privileged to introduce arne duncan. [applause] >> i want to thank the children for their fantastic support. please give a round of applause for the work she is doing. [applause] i think she is an amazing leader, and d.c. has come a long way and has a long way to go. with her passion in her
a temporary city in the desert. it has all the -- it is everything any normal city would provide. it last trade days. -- lasts for eight days. it is kind of radical but radical in both senses of that term. radical conventionally means pushing boundaries, going beyond normal categories. the thing about how it is used, it is deeply rooted in the human soul. things that go deep. and did not change that are fixed. we created a kind of city that goes to those extremes at the same time. it broadens your view. and we have this roiling improvisation taking place. on government interactions. all that -- of it unplanned. at the center you have a man and the city is without like a big temple complex. and you can find those things at the same time, this radical coherence and freedom. it can begin to do something, then new creative -- you great meeting -- create meaning that is substantial. >> one of the most beautiful things, we were talking about are backstage. the idea of cultural capital, considering we're in a context of the economics of culture. one of the most beautiful things about the festiva
. nothing to stop the epidemic of senseless gun violence that plague not only our major cities like new york and chicago, but countless small towns throughout our nation, towns with names like newtown, aurora, tucson, dekalb, blacksburg and littleton. in the years i have been a member of this body, this house has not held a single hearing, not one to address gun violence. while over 30,000 americans die each year from gun violence, over 400 lives have been lost by gun violence in my hometown of chicago, people are dying every day. . we in this body are afraid to talk about it. the time has come for us to stop listening to the gun lobby and start listening to the american people. the fact is the majority of americans gun owning and not, desire commonsense, reasonable gun regulation. congress must no longer stand in the way of reasonable legislation, instead we must champion it. the american people want to see background checks required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform b
mayor of kansas city, missouri, but he's also an ordained methodist pastor. pastor cleaver is frequently called upon for words to deliver at my whip meeting on thursday mornings. i have said they are the highlight of our week, in many respects. emanuel cleaver speaks to us about humanity, about caring, about respecting each of our colleagues on either side of the aisle, of respecting and honoring our responsibilities to our fellow citizens. in short, emanuel cleaver on a weekly basis appeals to the best that is within us, to reflect the best that is america. emanuel cleaver will shortly be succeeded as president of the c.b.c. by marcia fudge from ohio. like emanuel cleaver, a leader of conscience, a leader of great ability and a leader who will reach out to all of us as well and continue to lead this organization that we know is the conscience of the congress. as we talk about creating jobs, as we talk about caring for one another, as we talk about makinging life better for all americans, there is no more compelling voice than the congressional black caucus towards that end. and there ha
alleges of voter fraud. that is "washington times" reporting on that. also, a dozen states and cities will raise the minimum wage jenna refers. efforts afoot in congress and other state legislation -- legislatures to put the increases next year -- we will turn to that issue in the last 30 minutes or show -- or so. your take on whether or not congress should be increasing the minimum wage. also on the fiscal cliff, "washington post" frontpage this morning, the tea party largely silenced on fiscal cliff. some in the movement feel that no voice on the core issue. paige, ibm member. does religion influence of politics? caller: religion does influence politics. not mine, per say, but i watched c-span all the time and my comment is religion, like with the palestinians and the jewish conflict over there, why do you guys never bring up that israel was purchased for those people over there? it is almost like a pilgrim and indian situation. host: what does this have to do with this? caller: it is all about christianity and muslim. almost like the old school crusades. host: ok, all right. camp h
have now? >> and overgrown city with too many politicians and lobbyists and consultants and media. seven out of the 10 richest counties in the united states, metropolitan washington, is the capital that cannot produce. it is the country that is still great with capital that is not. >> who in 1775 whatever predicted this? >> i suspect some of them were pretty cynical about politics. if you ever had an idea there would be a country of 300 million people with a capital that would have its finger on everything in the world, they might have been able to come up with a little pcynicism about that. >> said during the last years of the campaign of 2012, you started. >> the first time i did something like that was in the 1990's. i wrote a book about the english-speaking civil wars. the english revolution, the american revolution, and the american civil war. i did that because i cannot stand the idea of thinking about it bill clinton and newt gingrich too much. nice to take a vacation from those guys. when i ran out of gas writing books about politics and economics, which i did a number of
. that would be to invest in the city that symbolizes bow at the u.s. many urge both the u.s. manufacturing and assets to help -- both u.s. manufacturing in the assets to help our economy grow stronger. it is facing its own fiscal cliff. i will soon be introducing a bill that will allow the city to refinance its considerable debt at a lower interest rate, saving it. furthermore, i am proposing eliminating capital gains taxes on investment. it is a way to spur investment. saying that, in the city of jewish right we have an extraordinarily high number of people who have lost hope because they are not working. they're out the metropolitan region -- throughout the metropolitan region we have thousands of job better going unfilled because they cannot find people qualified to be hired into those jobs. we have a skills gap in detroit as well as in this country. i know you understand these economic challenges we are facing. how you feel investing in assets innovation would help us close that gap? >> i in the first university graduate in my family. the only reason i studied science and came to this
to the foundation's intent to sue the city for its city seal which contained a cross and a billboard that included elements of that city seal that was in a city park. mr. speaker, this is an outrage. the seal and sign are harming no one. they are widely embringsed by the citizens of bulla kansas. it contains the words values and progressive ideas. unfortunately in this case progressive ideas are making a war on traditional values and it's high time for that to stop. some will claim the first amendment to the constitution requires the cross be removed from this seal and sign. that's hogwash. the first amendment begins with the words congress shall make no law prohibiting the free exercise thereof. in this instance congress made no law. for that reason alone the first amendment does not apply. furthermore, it cannot be set that this simple seal in any way is an establishment of religion. there is no officially supported secretary or denomination in the manner, this is not in any way an endorsement of any particular religion or any religious denomination. in short the first amendment as originally wr
, is still -- parts are without power. we're going on six weeks now. in many parts of the city and the region we're really pushed back decades for the last six weeks. it's kind of hard to understand unless you've been there. and i think mr. boehner -- speaker boehner is sensitive to that. his remarks have been very positive. that we need to address the needs of the people and deal with the payment for that later. i would hope this would not get embroiled in what already seems to be, by many americans, insurmountable problems. this should not be insurmountable. we should address it and we will have to deal with it at some point. but this needs to be addressed immediately. >> any of us who have been affected by a natural disaster, in our case in california, earthquakes, floods, fire, whatever, but the moment when the people look to the public sector to say, do we really have this compact, are you there for us? when the storms hit last time into the new york area, our members came to us and said the devastation was so great that it has changed in some ways the character of our communities. the s
that are not just in your house but are in your neighborhood. your cities. our states, the vibrancy of our country. and we are headed over the fiscal cliff after four years of leadership from this president who is running, running directly to the fiscal cliff. has even said, and secretary of treasury said, we don't mind jumping off this cliff. mr. speaker, we should not be having that kind of attitude. we should have the attitude that we are for everybody. we want to be for american entrepreneurship and especially small business because it's small business, family farms, small business electrical companies, people who put their name on the buildings, creativity. people get up to go to work every day. that's who we are going to hurt. we are not just going to hurt them, we are going to hurt their business families. people who they have had employed, small communities, large communities, but small business which is the engine of our economy. that's really who we are going to punish. lastly, we should not do it at this time just like we should not have two years ago, but i guess we were aiming for an
home for the royal navy. the navy will remain an major employer in the city. i'm sure my friend will also welcome the enterprise zone on the port and that is a 25 billion pound package that will create jobs. >> in june 2010, the prime minister said that despite the government's deficit reduction plan, he will ensure "no increase in child poverty." does he still stnd by that? >> we're doing everything we can to tackle child poverty and it has come down. the point -- that we specifically did we increased the element in child tax credit that goes to the poorest families. >> in the wake of the criminal convictions of of the staff who abused people living at this hospital, is it not time that those who take the fees and supervise those and are held to account of a new offense of corporate neglect? >> i listen to the point my friend makes. there has been appalling incidents of unacceptable level of care. people inside those organizations are subject to the law. >> mr. speaker, one of the greatest issues if northern ireland and the united kingdom is the price of electricity. can the pr
the city has canceled the los angeles premiere of this film. i think some self restraint is in order. i do not believe gratuitous violence does not help the situation. i do not want to curtail our first or second amendment rights of the constitution. host: there is this headline in "the washington post" this morning. host: does that need to be looked at as well? guest: we had much more of a country that still restricted alcohol after prohibition four decades ago. that is one reason atf has fewer agents. canada tried to register the firearms and tried for over 10 years and finally dropped it. that didn't work out. i am not saying we shouldn't keep better records. fbi and other agencies should look at the background of everyone. i am not an expert in all these areas. having this debate where everybody blames the gun and everybody says it is the people involved on the other side, that is too simplistic. we have to put everything on the table. we can debate everything. we should debate our mental health situation. connecticut does not allow forced medication for people that are mentally ill. a
. if you are in new york city, schoolteachers and firemen make $100,000 a year and they are easily in households the approach the limit. it depends and where you live. among high-income people, there is a wide range of what people pay in taxes. if you're a lawyer in washington, i find them to be reasonable people who work long hours. you are probably paying 28%. if you are on wall street and you are well-connected if you have a capacity to have your income defined as investment as opposed to salary even though it is indeed salary income. if you are somebody like jamie dimon or warren buffet, you can get away with 14% tax. the real problem with upper individuals are not the people who pay the taxes we intend for the to pay, but all the people who get away without paying any taxes at all. those tax breaks and write offs are derived by the president and by democrats, but they never seem to get fixed. one reason is republicans do not want them fixed. and the other hand, the democrats get a lot of campaign contributions from wall street. that is a real problem on both sides of the aisle
of supervisors. i remember that. like the mayor or the city attorney to find out what his job was like. that was a good thing. one of the reasons -- one of the things i thought in architecture in australia, they built a parliament. this. the building goes down almost to the ground and it is covered with grass. the children would go to the top and they would roll down to the bottom. i thought that was a good idea. the association in their mind would be this democratic government of australia has a place where i can go roll down the hill. it will have a positive association andit will make them more interested. i am pointing out there is no simple technique. ultimately, it does depend on building support for this idea. it means explaining, debating, discussing. the press shows everybody what is going on. if there had been people there, i think the report on things, maybe some terrible things that happened and the world on the 20th century would not have happened. >> right here. >> [inaudible] i am an attorney here in d.c. andi have been working on rule of law for many years. in russia an
secretary and odot, we took down 9,000-foot bridge in oklahoma city. and to get rid of structurally deficient and obsolete bridges. so over the next 10 years, we will go from the bottom in the country in terms of structurally deficient and obsolete bridges to the top in terms of creating that infrastructure in our state. and we're literally recycling beams and saving millions of dollars by something that would have just been thrown out under normal circumstances. and it's the only project like that of its kind in the country that we're pretty proud of. the other thing that we're doing, roxanne's governor, governor hickenlooper, tom mentioned before the third bucket of energy. governor fallin and governor hickenlooper created an initiative to convert state fleets to c.n.g. and governor mcdonell as well is supportive. we went to detroit with a group of 13 governors signed on to an m.o.u. and we had -- convert our fleets to c.n.g. and produce a fleet vehicle and give us that ability to do that efficiently. we'll give you the market. we'll put up 5,000 cars that we commit to buying. and
question -- what should be the president's number one agenda. next up is christine from new york city on the independent line. caller: good morning. i believe the president will not be able to accomplish his agenda without doing something that i believe is supported by the majority of the american people, that is the critical need for campaign finance reform to restore us to democracy that the people are represented at intergovernment instead of special interests. if we got campaign finance reform enacted, i know john mccain wanted it and a lot of other people -- we could then move on to do what we desperately need to do, which is begin to address the climate crisis. it is all over the world. venice, italy is flooded. a tornado in italy the other day. japan just had another tsunami. the disaster of sewage and leaks. the climate apex for a meeting was just a in dubai. they came to the conclusion that climate change is over use of fossil fuels and natural gas and oil. the amount of fossil fuels utilize by countries with huge populations such as india and china. we need energy, but we ne
to the veterans. they fly from 117 cities from across the country and had flown over 100,000 veterans to date. for the past two years, by business partners and our team at freethink media have followed the veterans from the stars and stripes organization in milwaukee. there are two veterans here today that are amazing guys who have become my friends. there is julian. [applause] julian and served on the navy -- in the navy. . he is a published poet. he took his first trip to washington d.c. on and on our flight. next, i want to tell you about joe. he is gone -- he is accompanied today by his wife terese. many of you no joke, but you might not know why. his picture was taken in 1945 for the "life magazine." it was called the human skeleton, weighing only 70 pounds. his photograph became one of the most iconic images of world war two. it is only fitting that today is joe's 87th birthday. [applause] gio and julian's stories have been submitted to the veterans history project at the library of congress. for years and years, researchers and documentarian's can use those stories for their future pro
. >> the city is tied up in knots over the so-called fiscal cliff. what are the foreign policy implications? >> one of the things i always find in congress is the minute we have budgetary restrictions -- before we even knew the word cliff with regard to this -- makes great rhetoric or demagoguery to say, we need money for at home. we do not need money for around the world. it always gets applause and it is great. but the truth is that the united states needs to be engaged around the world because we are the world power. we are a superpower, and we have interests. foreign aid, all it does other countries could, also does as good. -- although it does other countries good, it also does us good. i worry about -- if you take foreign aid that is less than 1% of the u.s. budget, if he did a survey amongst the population, i think it is 15% -- they think it is 15% and should be cut. if we start cutting foreign aid, cutting security for our diplomats around the world, being penalized and pound foolish, i think as a world power we need to maintain a robust foreign policy and make sure our people are p
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